Shopping Cart - $0.00

You have no items in your shopping cart.

2017 Ohio Statehouse Ornament

Availability: In stock

Item #:114090

$22.00

Be the first to review this product

 

 
2017 Ohio Statehouse Ornament

Details

Ohio Statehouse 2017 Ornament
Featuring the Rotunda Floor

The iconic floor of the Rotunda is a marvel in its own right. In the very center of the floor, which covers an area of approximately 3,270 square feet, is a circle encompassing hexagons of black, white, and red stone, surrounded by three stone rings: green, black, and green. Radiating out from the center is a 32-point star of black and red on a white ground. A border of green surrounds the entire star shape and its center. Radiating out from the center are alternating black and white stone hexagons, laid in a Fibonacci-inspired sequence. This sequence of black and white hexagons, which grow in size as they expand out from the center of the floor, creates an undulating visual affect that was a notable element of the Op Art movement of the 1960s. In terms of American aesthetics, the Statehouse floor was about 100 years ahead of its time! The stone used to create the 4,957 pieces of tile was purchased under the description of marble—quarried in Vermont, Italy, and Portugal—but modern-day geologists often counter that the black stone is actually limestone. According to the June 27, 1860 edition of the Ohio State Journal, the name of the draughtsman who designed the plans for the floor was Lucian Brown and the “celebrated firm” of Rose, Neill & Diamonds from New York were contracted to lay the tile at a total cost of about $6,000.

Product Tags

  • No tags connected to product

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

  1. Be the first to review this product

WRITE YOUR REVIEW

Write Your Own Review

Only registered users can write reviews. Please, log in or register

2017 Ohio Statehouse Ornament
Ohio Statehouse 2017 Ornament
Featuring the Rotunda Floor

The iconic floor of the Rotunda is a marvel in its own right. In the very center of the floor, which covers an area of approximately 3,270 square feet, is a circle encompassing hexagons of black, white, and red stone, surrounded by three stone rings: green, black, and green. Radiating out from the center is a 32-point star of black and red on a white ground. A border of green surrounds the entire star shape and its center. Radiating out from the center are alternating black and white stone hexagons, laid in a Fibonacci-inspired sequence. This sequence of black and white hexagons, which grow in size as they expand out from the center of the floor, creates an undulating visual affect that was a notable element of the Op Art movement of the 1960s. In terms of American aesthetics, the Statehouse floor was about 100 years ahead of its time! The stone used to create the 4,957 pieces of tile was purchased under the description of marble—quarried in Vermont, Italy, and Portugal—but modern-day geologists often counter that the black stone is actually limestone. According to the June 27, 1860 edition of the Ohio State Journal, the name of the draughtsman who designed the plans for the floor was Lucian Brown and the “celebrated firm” of Rose, Neill & Diamonds from New York were contracted to lay the tile at a total cost of about $6,000.

$22.00
0 100
2017 Ohio Statehouse Ornament
Ohio Statehouse 2017 Ornament
Featuring the Rotunda Floor

The iconic floor of the Rotunda is a marvel in its own right. In the very center of the floor, which covers an area of approximately 3,270 square feet, is a circle encompassing hexagons of black, white, and red stone, surrounded by three stone rings: green, black, and green. Radiating out from the center is a 32-point star of black and red on a white ground. A border of green surrounds the entire star shape and its center. Radiating out from the center are alternating black and white stone hexagons, laid in a Fibonacci-inspired sequence. This sequence of black and white hexagons, which grow in size as they expand out from the center of the floor, creates an undulating visual affect that was a notable element of the Op Art movement of the 1960s. In terms of American aesthetics, the Statehouse floor was about 100 years ahead of its time! The stone used to create the 4,957 pieces of tile was purchased under the description of marble—quarried in Vermont, Italy, and Portugal—but modern-day geologists often counter that the black stone is actually limestone. According to the June 27, 1860 edition of the Ohio State Journal, the name of the draughtsman who designed the plans for the floor was Lucian Brown and the “celebrated firm” of Rose, Neill & Diamonds from New York were contracted to lay the tile at a total cost of about $6,000.

$22.00
0 100